Jani_Nykanen

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October 19, 2017
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Joined March 07, 2014
Games (5)

A Journey to Eternity
July 24, 2016
Operation Fungus
December 14, 2015
The Last Minute Dungeon
December 12, 2016
The End
June 27, 2017
Flying Cat Stomper
July 26, 2017


Programming a game in Go
Posted on July 19, 2017 at 16:13

My software renderer was not going anywhere, I did not have a good game idea plus the renderer had some problems (it had problems with depth buffering if the shapes were too flat), so I decided to do something different.

I decided to join a game jam. I found this one: https://itch.io/jam/gopher-jam

Yeah, it has been running over two months and there is only one entry this far, but hey, at least it's easier to win! (And easier to lose, also)

The goal is to make a game in Go, a programming language I had pretty much zero experience in. The jam ends in 31st, but since Ludum Dare is coming, I have only nine days left (already spent three).

Here's my progress this far:



I must say that Go is actually a pretty horrible language. It has good features packed to a bunch of weird design choices. More opinions later.

I'll update this blog every time I get something new done, which means quite often since I have so little time.


A video:
Posted by Jani_Nykanen July 21, 2017 9:29 - 3 months ago
| [#1]

Quote
I must say that Go is actually a pretty horrible language. It has good features packed to a bunch of weird design choices.


That's exactly how I felt about it. I really wanted to like it, but I just couldn't. So gross.
Posted by Cpsgames July 21, 2017 17:10 - 3 months ago
| [#2]

I'm interested to hear your opinions on Go. Most criticism I've seen seems to be that it's too simple or just that it lacks generics. I've dabbled in it a bit myself but haven't really done enough in it to form a real opinion on the language.

This seems to be bandied around a lot:
Quote: Rob Pike, creator of Go
The key point here is our programmers are Googlers, they’re not researchers. They’re typically, fairly young, fresh out of school, probably learned Java, maybe learned C or C++, probably learned Python. They’re not capable of understanding a brilliant language but we want to use them to build good software. So, the language that we give them has to be easy for them to understand and easy to adopt.
Posted by F1ak3r July 26, 2017 10:54 - 2.9 months ago
| [#3]

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